Science Indian Rocket to Power European Space Startup’s First Reusable Spaceplane

Indian Rocket to Power European Space Startup’s First Reusable Spaceplane

Indian Rocket to Power European Space Startup

According to TechCrunch, the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) will power the inaugural demo mission of European space company The Exploration Company. The mission, which is scheduled for January 2024, will put the company’s Bikini reusable spaceplane to the test.

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Indian Rocket to Power European Space Startup: The Bikini is a two-person spaceplane designed to transport astronauts into and out of low-Earth orbit. The spaceplane is still in the works, but The Exploration Company aims to use it to provide affordable and long-term access to space.

The PSLV is a dependable and adaptable launch vehicle that has successfully launched a wide range of satellites and spacecraft. It is an excellent choice for The Exploration corporation’s first demo trip because it will give the corporation with a dependable and cost-effective way to launch its spaceplane.

Indian Rocket to Power European Space Startup: The project is noteworthy for The Exploration Company since it will be the first time a reusable spaceplane has been sent into orbit. The mission’s success will help pave the path for commercial space tourism and other space exploration endeavours.

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Here are some further mission details:

Indian Rocket to Power European Space Startup:

  • The Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India, will launch the mission.
  • The Bikini spaceplane will be launched into low-Earth orbit by the PSLV.
  • The Bikini will next fly a series of test flights, culminating in a return to Earth.
  • The mission is scheduled to last several days.

Indian Rocket to Power European Space Startup: The accomplishment of this mission would be a significant step forward for commercial space travel. It would show that reusable spaceplanes are a realistic way to travel to and from space, opening the door to more affordable and accessible orbit travel.